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Home of the Old Ammo Guy's Virtual Cartridge Trading Table

Offering a wide range of antique, obsolete, and modern ammunition and related items for collectors


Cartridge boxes, guns, gun parts, powder flasks and cans, loading tools, and related items for sale or trade..

I will list here cartridge boxes and other gun and ammo related items as I get them in. These will usually be singles, but I will indicate if I have more than one if that is the case. When I do have more than one of an item, the one you receive may not necessarily be the same one pictured on this page, but any condition problems that differ from the pictured item will be discussed prior to finalizing the sale or trade. For foreign sales, cartridges will have to be made inert prior to shipping.

 


Frankford Arsenal assortment of .45 Revolver (.45 Colt & Schofield) boxes

 

1875 - box is missing it's top and a single Benet-primed cartridge remains   $125

 

 

 

 

 

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1878 - box is missing it's top and a single Benet-primed cartridge remains   $100

 

 

 

 

 

1878 - sealed and retains it's pull string, in excellent condition  $450

 

 

 

 

 

 

1889 blanks - stamped on top OCT. 4 1889; sealed with it's pull string intact, and in excellent condition, cartridges made after 1881 will be externally primed  $225

 

 

 

 

 

Frankford Arsenal bar primed .50-70 cartridges made in 1867

Pictured here is a full carton of Frankford Arsenal bar-primed .50-70 Springfield cartridges, taken from a wood crate that was packed at the arsenal in April of 1867. The full crate held 25 of these cartons when originally found in the 1950s by a gentleman in Utah, who sold a number of the cartons in the succeeding years at local gun shows. The carton contains eight small 5 round boxes, each of which will be labeled on the front 5 CENTRE-PRIMED METALLIC CARTRIDGES CALIBRE .50 FRANKFORD ARSENAL 1867. The stenciling on the wood crate shows that it was initially sent to Major John R. Edie in Omaha, Nebraska. Major Edie was on temporary duty as Chief Ordnance Officer for the Army's Department of the Platte in Omaha. He had been tasked with making arrangements for the supplying of troops under the command of the department with the newly issued Model 1866 Breech-Loading (2nd Model Allin) rifles and the new center fire bar-primed ammunition that was initially issued with them as replacements for their Civil War muzzle-loading rifles, which had become a high priority issue for the Army following the December 1866 Fetterman massacre. Major Edie had been a member of the military board which selected the Springfield trapdoor rifle for adoption by the Army. In 1873, he was the Ordnance Department officer who signed the contract with Colt's Firearms Manufacturing Company for the first 8,000 Single Action Army revolvers. His signature as the Armory Ordnance Inspector, along with that of Armory Sub-inspector O. W. Ainsworth, appears on the inspection reports that were made for these revolvers after their delivery to the armory.

 From Omaha, the crate was shipped to Lt. Col. William H. Lewis, Commanding Officer of Camp Douglas, near Salt Lake City, Utah. Lt. Col. Lewis also had an interesting military career. During the Civil War, he received a Brevet promotion to Major in March of 1864 for gallantry and meritorious service involving the destruction of a Confederate train at the battle of Peralta, New Mexico. He was the commanding officer of Fort Dodge, Kansas when, in 1878, troops under his command engaged a band of renegade Cheyenne Indians near White Woman Creek in Scott County, Kansas. During the battle, Lt Col Lewis sustained a wound to a femoral artery, from which he died the following day, September 28, while enroute to Fort Wallace, Kansas. He has the dubious distinction of being the last casualty of the last Indian battle in Kansas.

The 40 round cartons with their 5 round packs were made for less than a year; a similarly labeled 20 round box replaced it in the later part of 1867. 

The 5 round packs are $600 each; the 40 round carton is not available for sale.

 

Full box of UMC Co military contract .50-70 cartridges made in 1873

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This is another box of .50-70 cartridges that was found in its original wood shipping crate;  in this case the crate was packed on Christmas Eve in 1873 at UMC's Bridgeport ammunition works with fifty of these boxes of cartridges, destined for the Army depot in Washington, D.C. These were probably part of two million .50 caliber cartridges that the government contracted with UMC to produce in late 1873. At that time, the government arsenals were focused on production of the new .45-70 cartridge, as the Model 1873 Springfield had just been selected as the standard for Army use in May of 1873. Once the crate was packed and the top secured in place, it was painted  a dark red, then stenciling and the date stamps were applied to both ends, and it was ready to be shipped. Upon arrival in Washington, it was probably packed away and forgotten for a while. Some time later, the top was re-painted gray, and addressed in black stenciled lettering for shipment to the Adjutant of the Virginia State Militia, in Richmond. Typically, the guns and ammunition issued to the states were, in turn, distributed to the various county militias. These were usually stored in the county court house where, more often than not, they were never needed. This was certainly the case for at least a portion of the boxes that were in the crate, as the ten unopened boxes that came with it were in very good condition. The fact that the original top was still with the crate would support the likelihood that it was still screwed in place when found by the previous owner. One opened box was also found with the crate, revealing the cartridges also to be in excellent condition. They are the Berdan primed, unheadstamped case style with the raised ring head typical of early UMC cartridge production. The box labels are rather plain, lacking the 'dog's head' UMC logo that was standard on the company's ammunition intended for commercial sale during the 1870s and 1880s. Four patent dates are printed on the labels; these include Hiram Berdan's patents of March 20, 1866, for the external primer cap and fixed anvil in the head of the shell, and September 29, 1868, for a cup fitted inside the case to strengthen the head. The other two are S. W. Wood's patents of April 1, 1862 and April 2, 1872, both of which I believe applied to the processes for forming drawn brass cartridge cases.

The boxes themselves are constructed of four separate pieces of cardboard, consisting of two pieces to form the body of the box and two end pieces, all held in place by a pasted-on buff colored paper wrapper, with a pull string for opening the box. When viewed from the end, the top and bottom do not form 90 degree angles to the front and back, but instead are canted slightly. As a result, when the cartridges are placed in the box, the bullet tips resting against the angled bottom cause the rims of the front row of cartridges to be positioned slightly above the back row, allowing for easier removal of the cartridges from the box. The pull string can be seen to the upper right in the picture. Pulling this string tears the paper wrapper across the end of the box, then across the back and the other end. The top can then be opened and 'hinged' on the untorn wrapper along the front top edge of the box to expose the cartridges.

This box is solid and in very good condition, with the exception of several areas of silverfish damage on the ends.  $900.00

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Rim Fire Boxes:

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Federal Lightning .22 long rifle........

This is a full box of Federal Cartridge Corporation Lightning .22 long rifle cartridges. Brass case with F headstamp. Cartridges and box are in excellent condition. Product number 510; 'Howard's' $1.00 price sticker on end flap. $15.00

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Federal Hi-Power .22 short hollow points.....

This is a full box of Federal Hi-Power .22 short hollow points. Brass case with HP headstamp. Product code 703. Price stamp (57 cents) on front. Cartridges and box are in very good condition.  $25

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Winchester Smokeless EZXS .22 long rifle Match.....

These boxes of Winchester smokeless EZXS .22 long rifle cartridges were still in the brick, so they are in excellent condition. They were made between 1944 and 1954. I have several of these at $30 each.

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.Full box of Peters Rustless .22 Long Rifle......

This box format was introduced by Peters in 1928, prior to their acquisition by Remington in 1934, and continued in the product line with various small changes intil about 1948.  This particular box, with the DuPont logo on the front and its Peters Cartridge Division, Remington Arms Company, Inc address, was made from about 1941 to 1946. This box is full and in excellent condition.   $20

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Full 'Target' box of Western Super Match .22 Long Rifle.....

Western introduced this Super Match box format in 1933; the cartridges were loaded with smokeless powder and non-corrosive priming, with a 40 grain Lubaloy coated (copper plated) lead bullet. The Lubaloy coating was dropped soon after introduction, replaced by an unplated greased lead bullet. This box format remained in their product line until the early 1940s. This box is full and in excellent condition.    $25

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Winchester Wildcat .22 Long Rifle.......

The Wildcat line of .22 long rifle cartridges was designed to be a promotional brand for sale through discount stores. This box format was introduced about 1980 when Olin Corporation combined the Winchester and Western brands to the single name Winchester-Western. In 1981, after the sale of the firearms part of Winchester-Western to the US Repeating Arms Company, they reintroduced the Winchester brand. This box was made after the 1981 change, and is full and in excellent condition.    $5

 

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Remington High Velocity .22 Long Rifle.......

This box was probably made in the 1970s to 1980s. It is full and in excellent condition.   $5

 

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Center Fire Handgun Boxes:

 

Winchester .32 Automatic

This full box is in very good condition with a couple of  small areas on the front and back where the paper has peeled off. Dates from 1944 to 1954. Cartridges are excellent. $35

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USAC .38 Special plastic shell

This is a full box of 50 USAC 148 grain wadcutters. These were made for a few years in the mid-1980s, and are one example of many recent 'developments' in ammunition that did not catch on with shooters. With the exception of a slightly damaged corner (top left corner in picture), it in excellent condition. $30

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Sealed boxes of German WW2 9mm Luger.....

Perfect for displaying with a Luger or P38, these are sealed boxes of World War 2 German-made 9mm Parabellum cartridges. The box was apparently recycled, with the old label left in place and sealed with a new label. The cartridges have copper plated steel bullets and lacquered steel cases, and are headstamped  ak  St+  9  44. Made at the what had been the Sellier & Bellot factory at Vlasim, Czechoslovakia, which was placed under German control in 1939. I have several of these, unopened and in excellent condition, at $45each

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Center Fire Rifle Boxes:

A Full Box of .17-223 New Primed Empties

 This is a full box of.17-223 (4.32 x 45mm) new primed empty cases, with brass primer and headstamped R A 6 6, indicating production by Remington Arms in 1966. This cartridge was developed and used in the US Army's unsuccessful SPIW program during the early 1960s.  $50

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Unopened boxes of .276 Pederson.....

.These are the PD 42 case with the small silver colored 'monel' primer. Boxes are marked 'LUBRICATED NO. 2', indicating that the cases were coated with a thin layer of dry wax to prevent corrosion and stress cracks using a process patented by J. D. Pederson. Some of these boxes will have small holes in the bottoms where the tips of the bullets have poked through. Headstamp is F A 29. I have several of these at $70 each.

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A Clip of.30-06 Gallery Cartridges

A 5 round clip for the Model 1903 Springfield rifle, filled with .30-06 Model 1919 gallery practice cartridges. The 140 grain lead bullets make these pretty easy to identify. Like most I have seen, these are headstamped  RA   H 18, indicating they were made by Remington Arms at their Hoboken, New Jersey plant in 1918. The fact that the headstamp seems to pre-date the model number of the cartridge is explained by the fact that unfired rejected cases were used in the production of these cartridges. I have several of these full clips, all in very good condition.   $12.00

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Winchester-Western .38-40 WCF

The box has some edge wear but the ammo is excellent, 80 grain soft point  $40.00

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Full Box of Kynoch .450/400 3" Nitro Express

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This is a full box of .450-400 Nitro Express with 3" cases and  400 grain soft point bullets. These were likely made in the 1950s to early 1960s, as the fronts of the boxes were stamped with a 'keep out of reach of children' warning beginning around 1962. I have several of these; the boxes and cartridges are in excellent condition.   $50

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Sealed boxes of 7.5 x 54 French MAS cartridges......

These are sealed 15 round boxes of  7.5 x 54mm French MAS cartridges manufactured in Syria in 1957 and intended probably for use in French Model 1949 MAS rifles that the Syrians imported in the early-to-mid-1950s.  $10 per box

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Full sealed boxes of British WW2 production 7.92 x 57 Cartridges

These sealed boxes of 7.92 x 57mm cartridges were made for use in the Besa tank machine gun. They are headstamped K5   45   IIZ, indicating production at the Imperial Chemical Industries Kidderminster ammunition plant in 1945. The 'IIZ' indicates they are Mark II cartridges loaded with nitrocellulose powder. I have several of these.  $15 each 

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Full boxes of 8 x 56R Austrian and Hungarian.......

These are full 10 round boxes of 8 x 56mm rimmed cartridges intended for use in the Austrian and Hungariand Model 1895 rifles converted to this caliber in the early 1930s. They were produced in 1938, shortly after the Germans took over production of ammunition in Austria, as evidenced by the Nazi eagle grasping a swastika in the headstamp and on the box label. The boxes are opened; the cartridges are in 5 round clips. The large red 'S' on the labels indicates that they are loaded with pointed (spitzer) bullets.  $40 per box

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Shotgun Shells:.

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Two Hull Color Variations of the U.S.  NEW RAPID Shotshell

These two New Rapid new primed empty shotgun shells were made by the United States Cartridge Co in Lowell, Mass. between 1900 and 1910. The black shell is pretty uncommon, but the tan is quite rare. Prior to my finding a small number of these 6 or 7 years ago, only one tan shell was known, and it differs from this one, having a larger primer. Today, fewer than 10 shotshell collectors have one of these tan shells. Both shells are in excellent, unused condition, with just a small buildup of verdigris at the junction of the paper and brass.   $20 for the black, $350 for the tan..

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American Buckle & Cartridge Co Special No 12

 

This 12 gauge SPECIAL new primed empty shotgun shell was made by the American Buckle & Cartridge Company of West Haven, Conn sometime between about 1885 and 1889, when the Ammunition Manufacturers Association (AMA) bought the company out. The AMA was a monopolistic organization made up of the Winchester Repeating Arms Co, the Union Metallic Cartridge Co, the United States Cartridge Co, and the Phoenix Metallic Cartridge Co. This shell is in excellent, unused condition.  $120

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Box of five AAI 12 gauge grenade blanks.....

This is a full box of five 12 gauge blank cartridges for use by law enforcement with the multi-purpose grenade (MPG) launcher. Inside the box is a sealed aluminum packet that contains the cartridges. These were produced in the late 1970s to early 1980s, and are beyond their expiration dates by about 20 years. The headstamp on the cartridges is REMINGTON PETERS 12 GA. The boxes and cartridges are in very good condition. I have only a few of these.   $5.00 per box

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Remington 12 gauge Kleanbore Nitro Express Extra Long Range #6C

Not the box pictured, but in about the same condition, with similar edge wear and marked on the end flap 7 1/2C on the upper right and EQUIV 3 3/4Ozs with 1 1/4 Oz - 7 1/2 C where the one pictured is marked 6 C  SMOKELESS POWDER. $30

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Other items:

 

Smith & Wesson 1883 advertising sheet......

This is a copy of a small single page two-sided advertising sheet issued by M. W. Robinson, one of Smith & Wesson's largest distributors, on March 1, 1883. Measures just 8.5" x 5.5", printed on both sides, and folded in thirds. The picture below shows both sides of the sheet.   $1.50 

For other advertising, click here.

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Frankford Arsenal .45 Revolver and .45-70 sizing dies......

These sizing dies are intended for use with a Army bench mounted tool for sizing fired cases for the .45 Colt and Schofield revolvers, and for the .45 Springfield rifle and carbine. They are marked 'REV' and 'RIFLE', and are also marked with the initials of the inspector - C.H.C. (C. H. Clark) and F.B. (Frank Barnes).  $100 for the pair 

 

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.Set of grips for Hi-Standard Model B .22 semi-auto pistol.......

In excellent condition (no screws) $50

 

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Marbles rifle cleaning rod in its original marked storage bag......

Three section brass rod is marked 'MARBLES GLADSTONE. MICH. U.S.A.' on the brass ferrule of the wood handle. It measures .250" in diameter and approximately 30" long, excluding the handle. As indicated on the cloth bag, it is Marble's item No. 9728, and is intended for .28 caliber and up. The bag has stains, and the writing has faded in spots; the rod is excellent.   $50

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Marbles rifle cleaning rod......

Three section brass rod is marked 'MARBLES' out at the end. It measures .205" in diameter and approximately 34" long, excluding the handle, and excellent condition with no storage bag.    $30

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Tatham's 'Patent Finish' buck shot bag ......

Marked 'Tathams PATENT FINISH DROP SHOT New York  B', in very good condition with age soiling.    $30

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Parker Brothers powder and shot measure.......

Excellent condition    $125

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Unmarked antique .31 bullet mold.......

Good condition with surface rust    $75

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Peace flask body in need of a head.....

Here's an original Peace Flask body that has lost its head. It appears to have spent some time under water, as all that remains of the two iron screws that held the head together is just a hint of rust. Aside from scattered dents and dings, and a stain that is obvious to the left of the hands in the right picture, the flask is in wonderful condition. The seams of the copper body are intact, with none of the separation often occurs with the soldered halves. The Peace flasks were made for the US Government from about 1837 to about 1858 by N. P. Ames and Batty & Co; the oval shape of the stars and the round carrying strap rings indicate that this flask was made by Batty between 1847 and 1858.   $250.00

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